Heavy Metal/Toxin Testing

Heavy Metal and Toxin Testing

a. Hair Analysis: Heavy metals may often have combined effects so that exposure to multiple heavy metals at low levels might be just as toxic as exposure to one metal at a high level. The toxicity of mercury and other heavy metals has been well established.

Heavy Metal Hair Analysis:
-is the easiest sample to collect and is considered the best for screening of heavy metals.
-is ideal for measuring toxic metals accumulated in the body tissues over a period of time.

Analytes Include:

Calcium Magnesium Sodium
Potassium Copper Zinc
Manganese Chromium Vanadium
Molybdenum Boron Iodine
Lithium Phosphorus Selenium
Strontium Sulfur Barium
Cobalt Iron Germanium
Rubidium Zirconium Calcium/Magnesium Ratio
Sodium/Potassium Ratio Zinc/Copper Ratio Zinc/Cadmium Ratio
Calcium/Phosphorus Ratio Aluminum Antimony
Arsenic Beryllium Bismuth
Cadmium Lead Mercury
Platinum Thallium Thorium
Uranium Nickel Silver
Tin Titanium

b. Red Blood Cell Membrane Heavy Metal Testing:

Analytes Include:

Lead

Mercury

Antimony

Arsenic

Cadmium

Tin

c. Porphyrins Profile: The Porphyrins Profile can help identify the severity of heavy metal toxicity or organic chemical exposure in patients. Chemical exposure and a heavy toxic burden can have physiological effects resulting in impaired metabolism and cellular function.

Porphyrin testing also helps you monitor therapy in your patients.

Porphyrin testing helps identify:

  • Levels of biochemical damage caused by toxicant exposure
  • Physiologic burden of a person’s level of toxins
  • Levels of porphyrin elevation correlated with levels of toxic interference
  • Toxicity of patients before and during chelation therapy
  • Toxicity of therapeutic drugs

d. Phthalates and Parabens Profile: The Phthalates & Parabens Profile can help identify everyday exposures to toxins from the use of items such as personal care products and plastic food containers. Environmental toxins should be evaluated as a “first step” to help patients get back on the road to wellness.Why assess phthalate and paraben levels? Exposure to phthalates and parabens is more common than you may realize. Phthalates and parabens are often classified as xenoestrogens, foreign compounds in the body functioning as endocrine disruptors by binding specifically to estrogen receptors.

e. Chlorinated Pesticides Profile: The Chlorinated Pesticides Profile can help identify when a patient has been exposed to certain pesticides and insecticides, and how high a body burden of chlorinated pesticides the patient is carrying. This panel looks at the most commonly found chlorinated pesticides, which have national reference ranges, that have been documented to cause adverse health problems. Levels are given both in parts per million (PPM) and as lipid-adjusted amounts so the clinician can best estimate the total body burden of these compounds.

f. PCBs Profile: The Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Profile can help identify which of the most toxic PCBs a patient has been exposed to and the body burden of the patient. We look at the most commonly found PCBs, which have national reference ranges, that have been documented to cause adverse health problems. Levels are given both in parts per million (PPM) and as lipid-adjusted amounts so the clinician can best estimate the total body burden of these compounds.

g. Volatile Solvents Profile: The Volatile Solvents Profile can help identify a patient’s prolonged exposure to the most commonly found volatile solvents that have been shown to cause serious health problems. Why run a Volatile Solvent Test?

Overexposure or chronic exposure to volatile solvents damages the central nervous system and causes chemical-driven liver and kidney damage. Benzene, in particular, has a severe toxic effect on the hematological system and is a recognized human carcinogen. Other solvents contribute to atrophy of skeletal muscles, loss of coordination, vision problems, and depression of the central nervous system.

h. Organophosphates Profile:

Are Organophosphate Pesticides Lurking in Your Home and Food?The Organophosphates Profile can help identify a patient’s prolonged exposure to organophosphate pesticides that have been shown to cause serious health problems. Why Use the Organophosphates Profile? Organophosphates can be hazardous to the neurological development of children and babies in the womb, producing lower IQs.(1) Other health effects include chronic fatigue, asthma, wheeze, immune system disorders, impaired memory, disorientation, depression, irritability, flu-like symptoms, and may increase risk of cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. Most exposure to organophosphates occurs from ingestion through the food supply. Direct dermal exposure can also occur for people that work directly with these chemicals.

i. Bisphenol A (BPA) Profile: The Bisphenol A Profile can help identify exposure to the common endocrine disruptors BPA, triclosan, and 4-nonylphenol.Why Test for Endocrine Disruptors? Endocrine disruptors weakly bind to estrogen receptors which can affect the endocrine, nervous, and immune systems as well as block thyroid hormone action. Exposure to chemicals that are xenoestrogens disrupt the proper function of the body’s endocrine system. Children and babies in the womb are most susceptible to hormonal and neurological development issues from exposure.

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